Various factors
 
increase the risk of developing TLS1-3

 

High tumor burden

High tumor burden

Elevated uric acid levels at baseline

Elevated uric acid
levels at baseline

Bulky disease

Bulky disease

Elevated WBC count

Elevated WBC count

Lymph node involvement

Lymph node
involvement

Bone marrow involvement

Bone marrow
involvement

Renal disease or renal involvement by tumor

Renal disease or renal
involvement by tumor

This is not a comprehensive list of all potential risk factors.

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There are a wide range of patient and tumor-specific factors that can increase the risk of tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) and hyperuricemia in your patients1-3

Are your patients at higher risk for TLS than you think?

Use this Risk Assessment Tool to help you identify patients who may be at risk for TLS

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EXPLORE ELITEK STUDY DESIGN

ALC=absolute lymphocyte count; CLL=chronic lymphocytic leukemia; CrCl=creatinine clearance; SLL=small lymphocytic lymphoma; WBC=white blood cell.

References: 1. Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma. V.1.2021. ©National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Accessed September 28, 2020. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to NCCN.org. NCCN makes no warranties of any kind whatsoever regarding their content, use or application and disclaims any responsibility for their application or use in any way. 2. Wilson FP, Berns JS. Onco-nephrology: tumor lysis syndrome. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2012;7(10):1730-1739. 3. Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for B-Cell Lymphomas. V.4.2020. ©National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Accessed August 26, 2020. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to NCCN.org. NCCN makes no warranties of any kind whatsoever regarding their content, use or application and disclaims any responsibility for their application or use in any way. 4. Cairo MS. Prevention and treatment of hyperuricemia in hematological malignancies. Clin Lymphoma. 2002;3(S1):S26-S31. 5. Edeani A, Shirali A. Chapter 4: Tumor Lysis Syndrome. Onco-Nephrology Curriculum. American Society of Nephrology. 2016. https://www.asnonline.org/education/distancelearning/curricula/onco/Chapter4.pdf. Accessed August 26, 2020. 6. Venclexta [prescribing information]. East Windsor, NJ: Acrotech Biopharma LLC; 2020. 7. Sprycel [prescribing information]. Princeton, NJ: Bristol-Myers Squibb Company; 2018. 8. Imbruvica [prescribing information]. Sunnyvale, CA: Pharmacyclics LLC; 2020. 9. Marqibo [prescribing information]. South San Francisco, CA: Talon Therapeutics; 2020. 10. Gazyva [prescribing information]. South San Francisco, CA: Genentech, Inc.; 2020. 11. Blincyto [prescribing information]. Thousand Oaks, CA: Amgen Inc.; 2020. 12. Velcade [prescribing information]. Cambridge, MA: Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc; 2019. 13. Adriamycin [prescribing information]. Bedford, OH: Bedford Laboratories; 2013. 14. Kyprolis [prescribing information]. Thousand Oaks, CA: Onyx Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; 2020. 15. Revlimid [prescribing information]. Summit, NJ: Celgene Corporation; 2019. 16. Rituxan [prescribing information]. South San Francisco, CA: Genentech, Inc.; 2020. 17. Bendeka [prescribing information]. North Wales, PA: Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc.; 2019. 18. Belay Y, Yirdaw K, Enawgaw B. Tumor lysis syndrome in patients with hematological malignancies. J Oncol. 2017. doi.org/10.1155/2017/9684909. 19. Bose P, Qubaiah O. A review of tumour lysis syndrome with targeted therapies and the role of rasburicase. J Clin Pharm Ther. 2011;36(3):299-326.